EdStat: There are Over 500 Medium- and High-Poverty Census Tracts across the Country without Nearby Charter Elementary Schools – by Education Next

A recent Fordham Institute analysis found that there are over 500 medium- and high-poverty Census tracts across the country without nearby charter elementary schools—but why is there such a dearth of options for students and their families? Securing affordable school facilities may be one of the issues. In an article in our Summer 2018 issue of Education Next, Robin J. Lake, T...

EdNext Podcast: Motivating American Students to Work Harder – by Education Next

In the United States, we don’t expect most kids to work very hard, and they don’t. So write Mike Petrilli and Adam Tyner of the Fordham Institute in a new EdNext article about student motivation. Should we try to make schools more engaging? Use external exams to hold students accountable for their learning? Adam Tyner sits down with Marty West to discuss some options that he an...

What We’re Watching: Are State Proficiency Standards Falling? – by Education Next

On Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at 12:00 pm, Education Next will present the results of its latest evaluation of the rigor of state proficiency standards at an event hosted by the Hoover Institution. Paul E. Peterson will present the results, which will then be discussed during a panel moderated by Martin West. Panelists will be: •  Catherine Brown, Vice President, Education Poli...

EdStat: 16 States and the District of Columbia Received a Grade of A or A- for Their Proficiency Standards in 2017 – by Education Next

Since 2005, researchers at Education Next have graded state proficiency standards on an A–F scale. To generate these letter grades, we compare the percentage of students identified as proficient in reading and math on state assessments to the percentage of students so labeled on the more-rigorous National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The higher the percentage of ...

Of Teacher Strikes, Inigo Montoya, and Claims of ‘Justice’ – by Frederick Hess

In response to my various scribblings on the teacher strikes, as you might imagine, I’ve received lots of feedback. While there are a range of opinions, one common view holds that my cold-blooded musings on things like staffing levels, pensions, and health-care costs miss the larger moral point. As one writer put it, “This isn’t about any of those things, thi...