Month: May 2019

In the News: Can You Skip 47 Days of English Class and Still Graduate From High School? – by Education Next

In Maryland’s largest school district, described in the Washington Post as “one of the nation’s best,” graduation rates are high, but may “reflect policy changes that have made it easier to pass courses, recover from failing grades and be out of class — even though schools routinely say students must attend classes.” Post reporters Donna St....

Starting With the ‘Why’ in Personalized Learning – by Betheny Gross

Last spring, on our first visit to 35 schools committed to personalized learning, teachers often told us they weren’t sure what they were supposed to be doing to personalize learning. Revisiting the same schools this fall, we realized a more fundamental issue was at play: many teachers didn’t seem entirely sure why they were personalizing learning in the first place. The teache...

Alternative Education: Rigor Redefined – by John M. McLaughlin

Back when I didn’t know squat, but had energy and naivety to spare, I started a school for students whose learning challenges, depression or anxiety made attendance at a large, comprehensive public high school problematic. They were also students traditional private and parochial schools didn’t want. A combination of 1960s social activism and a Fortune 50 executive father who ...

In the News: Drowning in Debt From Employee Benefits and Unwilling to Reform, Los Angeles Unified School District Looks for Lifeline in Measure EE – by Education Next

In Los Angeles, voters will weigh in on Measure EE, a ballot measure to raise funds for public schools, on June 4. This takes place at a time when the Los Angeles Unified School district estimates that “more than half of its general fund will be needed to pay down pension and health benefit debt by 2031,” Jason Henry notes in the Los Angeles Daily News. Henry write...