Month: January 2019

K-12 Schools Aren’t Getting Disrupted, but Markets that Provide Resources to Schools Are – by Thomas Arnett

If you’ve followed the K–12 education dialogue over the last decade, then you’re probably familiar with the term “disruptive innovation.” Edtech entrepreneurs and school choice advocates sometimes invoke it as an indomitable force that will redeem and transform broken school systems. Meanwhile, people on the other side of these debates worry that “disruption” is a flawed yet r...

What We’re Watching: Sen. Lamar Alexander on Reforming the Higher Education Act – by Education Next

On Monday, February 4 at 2:30 pm, the American Enterprise Institute will host Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) for a speech on the committee’s agenda for reforming the Higher Education Act. The remarks will be followed by a discussion. You can rsvp or watch the live feed here. Last fall, EdNext published a forum on the f...

One More Time Now: Why Lowering Class Sizes Backfires

You’ve probably read an article with a headline like this. Why say it again? Because class-size reduction continues to be so seductive. Our own state of North Carolina is just the latest in which policymakers have succumbed, causing a political firestorm this winter. Here it’s Republicans, but Democrats have heard the same call elsewhere. We thought we’d remind policymakers why...

Supreme Court Denies Review but Offers Roadmap for High School Coach Who Prayed – by Joshua Dunn

Even while declining to hear the case of a high school football coach who was punished for kneeling and praying at the fifty-yard line after games, the Supreme Court is inviting future cases that would give it an opportunity to revisit the issue of what the First Amendment’s Free Speech and Free Exercise clauses mean for teachers and coaches in public schools. The signal...

EdNext Podcast: New Rules Will Change How Schools Handle Sexual Assault Allegations – by Education Next

The Department of Education’s proposed new Title IX regulations have generated over 72,000 comments and a lot of debate, especially the requirement that schools allow students who have filed sexual-assault complaints to be cross-examined. As the public comment period for the new rules is about to close, Shep Melnick joins Marty West to discuss how federal mandates on se...

How Researchers and Policymakers Can Support Better Practices in Schools – by Robert Pondiscio

Almost exactly a year ago I wrote a piece in this space arguing that education reformers had “overplayed our hand, overstated our expertise, and outspent our moral authority by a considerable margin” as the movement morphed from idealism to policymaking over the past two decades. The way to get back on track, I suggested, is to refocus ed reform’s considerable energies on impr...

Redesigning Denver’s Schools – by Parker Baxter

Superintendent Tom Boasberg visits a 3rd-grade class at Park Hill School in Denver, August 2011. In October 2018, when Tom Boasberg stepped down as superintendent of Denver Public Schools (DPS) after 10 years on the job, he was no doubt frustrated to see his longtime critics rejoice. What likely disappointed him most, though, was that some of his strongest supporters abandoned ...

How Harvard Hurts Small Colleges – by Michael B. Horn

Over a quarter of existing colleges will likely fail—that is, close, merge, or declare bankruptcy—in the next 15 years. But a more massive set of failures over a longer timeline isn’t out of the question—closer to Harvard professor Clayton Christensen’s prediction that 50% of all colleges will fail in the next decade. There will be several drivers of the failures—a broken busi...

How Harvard Hurts Small Colleges – by Michael B. Horn

Over a quarter of existing colleges will likely fail—that is, close, merge, or declare bankruptcy—in the next 15 years. But a more massive set of failures over a longer timeline isn’t out of the question—closer to Harvard professor Clayton Christensen’s prediction that 50% of all colleges will fail in the next decade. There will be several drivers of the failures—a broken busi...