Month: November 2018

There’s a Reason Why Teachers Don’t Use the Software Provided By Their Districts – by Thomas Arnett

Earlier this month, education news outlets buzzed with a frustrating, yet unsurprising, headline: Most educational software licenses go unused in K-12 districts. The source of the headline is a recent report by Ryan Baker, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Learning Analytics. Baker analyzed data from BrightBytes, a K-12 data management company, on s...

What We’re Watching: Do Field Trips Have Educational Value? – by Education Next

Field trips can get pushed aside when schools decide to focus on math and reading skills in order to boost standardized test scores. Is anything lost as a result? In this 60-second video produced by AEI, Rick Hess takes a look at rigorous research by University of Arkansas professor Jay Greene on the benefits of culturally enriching field trips. Jay Greene’s first study ...

College Readiness, College Completion, and Race – by Michael J. Petrilli

twenty20.com Helping lots more young Americans get “to and through” four-year college degrees is a major goal of public policy and philanthropy. In 2009, President Obama set the target of leading the world in college completion by 2020. The Lumina Foundation aspires to increase the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates, and other credentials to 60 perc...

In the News: Black Teachers Improve Outcomes for Black Students – by Education Next

A new NBER working paper can be added to the growing list of studies finding that black students who have black teachers reap benefits in both the short term and the long term. In U.S. News, Lauren Camera describes the new study, which finds that Black students who have just one black teacher in elementary school are more likely to graduate and more likely to enroll in college...

A Closer Look at Improving Student Engagement by Letting Students Choose Their Tasks – by Robert Pondiscio

There’s a terrific story about the late Frank McCourt, who became famous as the author of Angela’s Ashes and other books, but who was Mr. McCourt the English teacher to a generation of students at Stuyvesant High and other New York City schools. One day a student asked what possible use a particular work of literature he assigned would have in his life. “You will read it for t...

The Politics of the Common Core Assessments – by Ashley Jochim

In 2009, 48 states and the District of Columbia joined together to launch the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Their mission: to develop common academic standards in English and mathematics that would help ensure that “all students, regardless of where they live, are graduating high school prepared for college, career, and life.” It was a laudable goal, but one that 15 y...

Community Colleges and Career Education – by Tamar Jacoby

Brian Coward is not what most people imagine when they think of a “college student.” Thirty-six years old, African American, from a low-income family in rural North Carolina, he tried college right out of high school, earning an associate degree in automotive systems. His passion was detailing ‎cars, but the business he started after college failed to take off, and...

The EdNext Podcast: Connecting Student Loans to Community College Attainment – by Education Next

As college costs rise, some see cause for alarm in rising levels of student loan debt. However, a new study finds that students who take out loans do better in school. Lesley Turner joins EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss that new study, “The Benefits of Borrowing: Evidence on student loan debt and community college attainment,” which she co-authored wit...