Month: October 2018

In the News: New Study Shows ‘Homework Gap’ Most Affects Students Already Likely to Fall Behind – by Education Next

A new study looks at the impact on students of having limited access to the internet outside of school. Students who only have access to the internet via a smartphone are less likely to spend time outside of class on school-related activities, the study finds. In addition, Laura Fay writes in The 74 The homework gap — a phrase describing the accumulation of missed assignments ...

Voters Care Less About Education This Year Than Reports Suggest – by Frederick Hess

On the cusp of next week’s midterms, a slew of media outlets have suggested that education will play an outsized role in determining the results. “Education is a top issue in midterms,” an NPR headline announced recently. The Washington Post’s Valerie Strauss noted that while education has never been voters’ top priority, “things seem different this year.” A Time magazine arti...

Making Evidence Locally – by Thomas J. Kane

The new federal education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), envisions a powerful role for states in managing the evidence base behind school improvement efforts. Not only must they certify that interventions meet the “evidence-based” requirements spelled out in the law, they also must monitor and evaluate federally funded school-improvement efforts going forward. The...

After the Teacher Walkouts – by Jeffrey R. Henig

Since the 1960s, teachers unions across the United States have used strikes or the threat of strikes to influence the terms of collective bargaining agreements with local school districts. In the spring of 2018, teachers in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, and elsewhere changed their tack, staging walkouts designed to secure salary hikes and increased school funding from stat...

Adaptation Could Bring New Strength – by Jeffrey R. Henig

Once considered king of the ring, teachers unions have spent most of this century counterpunching and playing defense. Political scientist Terry Moe has argued that teachers unions are by far “the most powerful groups in the politics of education.” But his assessment is based largely on unions’ advantages in local districts, where typically low voter turnout allows a mobilized ...

Statewide Strikes Are a Shot across the Bow – by Sarah F. Anzia

Teacher strikes and walkouts in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, and elsewhere grabbed public attention last spring, but these wildfires of statewide activism are unlikely to spread far. In most states, teachers have unique and powerful advantages in local politics—advantages they’re unlikely to give up anytime soon—and they’re already active in state politics as well. It’s on...

In the News: Longtime Miami Superintendent Chosen as Urban Superintendent of the Year – by Education Next

Miami-Dade Superintendent Alberto Carvalho was named Urban Superintendent of the Year for 2018 by the Council of the Great City Schools, Denisa Superville reports for Ed Week. “Alberto Carvalho has had a remarkable run as superintendent of one of the largest and most complex big-city school systems in the nation,” Michael Casserly, the executive director of the Cou...

ESSA could fund crucial shift in education research – by External Relations, Education Next

Contact: Thomas Kane: 617-496-4359, tom_kane@gse.harvard.edu, Harvard Graduate School of Education Jackie Kerstetter: 814-440-2299, jackie.kerstetter@educationnext.org, Education Next ESSA could fund crucial shift in education research Small-scale studies are the only path to sustained improvement, says expert Thursday, February 9, 2017—From pharmaceuticals to retail sales, inn...