Month: July 2018

EdStat: Twenty-Four Percent of Public K‒12 Schools had a General Instructional Coach by the 2015‒16 School Year, According to the National Teacher and Principal Survey – by Education Next

Historically, professional development for teachers has been dominated by daylong seminars that took teachers out of the classroom and delivered the same tips and tricks to an entire department, grade level, or school. But as research has found, these programs to have little or no effect on teacher quality. Some training has shifted to a customized, smaller-scale approach: ins...

Taking Teacher Coaching To Scale – by Matthew A. Kraft

The importance of individual teachers has emerged in sharp focus over the past decade, with compelling evidence that teachers have large effects on a range of student outcomes. Wide variability in teacher effectiveness, both across and within schools, highlights the persistent challenge of providing students with access to high-quality teachers. However, traditional efforts to ...

Who Will Provide Quality Control for Dual Enrollment Courses? – by Chester E. Finn, Jr.

Dual enrollment is on a roll. Enabling high school students to take college courses for college credit while still enrolled in high school is intended by its advocates to help solve multiple problems that plague American education. These include: • The boredom of high school students who have completed their requirements for graduation and are coasting as they wait for their di...

The Education Exchange: What Happened to Black Teachers When Southern Schools Were Desegregated? – by Education Next

Before schools in the southern U.S. were racially integrated, schools for African American students were staffed almost exclusively by African American teachers. After the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, southern schools began to be desegregated, and this had a big effect on black teacher employment. Economist Owen Thompsont talks with Paul E. Peterson about his paper, &#...

EdStat: Students Without Disabilities who had a Classmate With an Emotional/ Behavioral Disorder were 1.42 Times More Likely to be Chronically Absent – by Education Next

Most students without disabilities have at least two students with disabilities (SWDs) in their classes, but few studies have examined whether SWDs affect their classmates. Early studies that addressed peer effects in inclusive classrooms using older data did not identify any negative academic consequences of inclusion for students without disabilities. However, more-recent re...

Can Schools Commit Malpractice? It Depends – by Mark Dynarski

Recently seven students attending public schools in Detroit sued the state of Michigan in a Federal district court. Shortages of materials, not having skilled teachers, and poor conditions of their school buildings had deprived them of access to literacy, which, they argued, is essential in order to enjoy the other rights enumerated in the Constitution. From a research perspec...

In the News: New York City Confirms Plans to Close or Merge Nine Renewal Schools Next Year – by Education Next

In New York City, education officials announced that they will be closing 6 schools and merging three others after the schools, which were part of the Renewal program, failed to improve, Chalkbeat New York reports. One of the schools faced a threat of a state takeover at the end of this school year. When he ran for mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio promised big changes for...

A Better Future for Rural Communities Starts at the Schoolhouse – by Paul Hill

Donald Trump’s voters in rural areas and small towns made a point: they were left behind while a lot of the country made economic progress and they want that to change. It doesn’t matter whether you consider these voters adorable or deplorable. They have expressed a grievance in the most democratic of ways—through their votes. It’s well founded and legitimate, and we must now ...

What Are the Options for States Dealing With Unfunded Pension Liabilities? – by Chad Aldeman

Collectively, states face $1.4 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities, and $500 billion of that is due to teacher pension debt. As much as we here at Teacherpensions.org would like to shift the conversation to whether or not those pension plans are providing adequate retirement security to all teachers—they generally are not—the reality is that state legislators are much more...