Month: May 2018

How Teacher Pensions Are Cutting into Teacher Salaries: An Arizona Case Study – by Martin Lueken

First starting in West Virginia, a wave of teacher strikes has now spread to Arizona, Kentucky, Oklahoma, and North Carolina. The proximate cause would seem to be teacher salaries, which in recent years have stagnated in many states. A careful look at the situation in Arizona, however, sheds light on why teacher pay isn’t meeting expectations. Teacher salaries in Arizona have n...

EdStat: Students Attending Schools Backed by Silicon Schools Score 15 Points Above Proficiency on California State Assessments, on Average – by Education Next

Regional personalized learning funds, which connect foundations and local grantmakers to schools and their leaders, have launched or expanded most personalized and blended models thus far. But do such regional initiatives foster innovation or school improvement? In some cases, the answer may be yes. The performance of the schools in Silicon Schools’ portfolio, for example, con...

A NYC Mom Asks, “Why Aren’t Un-Zoned Schools Held to the Same Standards as Charter Schools?” – by Alina Adams

Hunter College Elementary School just released applications for spots in its 2017 kindergarten class. Popular perceptions to the contrary, Hunter is not a public school but, rather, a “publicly- funded” school. While the K-12 Upper East Side lab school is tuition-free, it is not under the auspices of the New York City Department of Education (DOE). It does not need to follow t...

EdStat: 69 Percent of Americans Support Laws Allowing States to Take Control of Local Districts Where Academic Performance Has Been Low for Several Years – by Education Next

According to the 2017 EdNext poll, the public strongly favors laws allowing states to take control of local districts where academic performance has been low for several years. Sixty-nine percent of Americans support these laws, including 75% of Republicans, 67% of Democrats, and 71% of parents. Teachers are less favorable toward these laws but nevertheless lean toward support...

EdNext Podcast: Tenure Reform and Test Scores in Florida – by Education Next

In 2011, a Florida law eliminated tenure for teachers hired on or after July 1, 2011. A new study looks at the impact of that change on student achievement in the state. Celeste Carruthers, an associate professor in the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, joins EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the new study, “Did Tenure Reform in Florida...

Kickstarters for Personalized Learning – by Julie Landry Petersen

At Cesar E. Chávez Multicultural Academic Center, a grantee of the NGLC Regional Fund for Breakthrough Schools in Chicago, students are engaged in the learning process through classroom-wide collaborative exercises. In the last five years, major philanthropic foundations have spent hundreds of millions of dollars to support “personalized” and “blended” learning, a set of classr...

The Education Exchange: How Have States Changed Their Standards? – by Education Next

Dan Hamlin, a postdoctoral fellow at the Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG) at the Harvard Kennedy School, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss their new article, “Have States Maintained High Expectations for Student Performance? An analysis of 2017 state proficiency standards.” Follow The Education Exchange on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher or her...