Month: March 2018

Why I Hope Betsy DeVos Boosts School Vouchers – by Derrell Bradford

Back in September, with the presidential election and Freddie Gray’s death as backdrops, my sister organization MarylandCAN hosted 50CAN’s annual summit in Baltimore, which included a dinner at the church of one of its board members. The city’s Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, where Gray lived and where I grew up many years ago, had been on my mind a lot during the days leadin...

Three Hoover Fellows on NAEP, A Nation at Risk, and the Future of Education Reform – by Education Next

Sponsors     April 25, 2018 – 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm Hoover Institution in DC 1399 New York Ave NW, Fifth Floor Washington, DC 20005 Register to attend On April 10, the U.S. Department of Education will release the latest results of the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), which will tell us how fourth- and eighth-grade students are faring nationally, in e...

EdStat: 1,700 Students Begin a Computer-Science Master’s Degree Through Georgia Tech’s Online Program Each Year – by Education Next

The authors of a recent study on Georgia Tech’s online computer-science master’s degree, which will be published in the forthcoming Summer 2018 issue of Education Next, saw significant demand for the first low-cost online degree offered by a highly ranked institution, primarily from students who would not otherwise pursue a master’s degree. Georgia Tech’s online program attrac...

Which Urban School Districts Have Been Moving in the Right Direction on NAEP? – by Michael J. Petrilli

For the past fifteen years, a set of large urban districts have agreed to participate in what’s still called the “Trial Urban District Assessment,” or TUDA, as part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. New TUDA scores will come out next month, just as they will for the nation and the states. To help us prepare, Fordham’s research interns and I dug into NAEP data ...

Rethinking School Discipline – by Constance A. Lindsay

In 2014, the Department of Education released results of its Civil Rights Data Collection that contained some alarming statistics about racial disparities in school discipline. The subsequent departmental guidance charged states and districts with changing their discipline practices to remedy these disparities. With the change in administration, there is discussion around resc...

In the News: Apple Tries to Regain Education Market Share With iPad Changes – by Education Next

Apple was in the news this week with the release of a new, lower-priced iPad meant specifically to appeal to schools, Tripp Mickle explains in the Wall Street Journal. He notes Technology companies have been pushing computers and other devices into the classroom since at least the 1970s, and Apple took an early lead with its easy-to-use operating system. But the company’s domin...

Private Schools Equally Good at Fostering Civic Participation – by Deven Carlson

The nomination of Betsy DeVos as secretary of education guarantees that school choice will remain a key component of the education policy agenda in 2017, as public charter schools continue to expand and state and federal policymakers implement or consider policies to expand access to private schools. Among the most prominent efforts will be Congressional attempts to reauthoriz...

EdStat: Between 2011 and 2015, Math Scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress Declined in 20 States – by Education Next

Between 2011 and 2015, math scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress declined in twenty states, rose in just nine, and were mixed in two. Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, and Vermont, for example, all saw declines in both fourth- and eighth-grade math scores. Over the same period of time, national trends were essentially flat. Mike Petril...