Month: December 2017

Behind the Headline: In D.C., A Radical Shift in Parent Involvement by Education Next

On Top of the News In D.C., A Radical Shift in Parent Involvement The Boston Globe | 3/28/2016 Behind the Headline Teacher Home Visits Education Next | Summer 2016 Stanton Elementary School teacher Sheryl Garner (right) on a home visit with the Colbert family In the Boston Globe, Michael Levenson describes how schools in Washington, D.C. are trying to involve parents in their c...

EdNext Podcast: Will Open Educational Resources Disrupt the Textbook Industry? – by Education Next

Teachers can now access a wealth of free resources online—from one image to a whole curriculum. But the growing reliance on open educational resources raises questions—who will produce them, how will they be compensated, how will educators be able to find the best ones, and how will all this affect the market for textbooks?   In this episode, Marty West talks with Michael McSh...

Can Civil Rights Institutions Keep Up as Public Education Evolves? – by Robin J. Lake

The NAACP’s resolution to oppose charter schools left thousands of black families whose children attend charter schools stunned. How could such a revered institution fail to recognize their beliefs and interests? Organizations like NAACP have earned our trust and respect. Decades of fighting on behalf of the powerless have given them good standing among politicians, media, and ...

Proposed ESSA Regulations Limit States on Accountability by Michael J. Petrilli

As everyone knows, the Department of Education released its latest package of proposed regulations today. Among other issues, this round addresses the heart of the Every Student Succeeds Act: its accountability provisions. The law, as you may recall, represented a major departure from No Child Left Behind, sending significant authority back to the states. It didn’t give them ca...

Open Educational Resources – by Michael Q. McShane

When Lois Griffin runs for school board in the animated television comedy Family Guy, she stumps on a platform of “competent teachers, a better-funded music department, and updated textbooks that don’t refer to the Civil Rights Movement as ‘trouble ahead.’” Perpetually outdated, inordinately expensive, and a pain to lug around, textbooks have been the bête noire of educators an...

What You Need to Know about ED’s Proposed Rule on Title I Supplement-Not-Supplant – by Nora Gordon

Whether the Department of Education is able to finalize its proposed rule on a change to a fiscal rule in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) will have sweeping effects for all students in the United States. The change was supposed to be straightforward, yet this has not been the case. Guests take pictures of the Every Student Succeeds Act after U.S. President Barack Obama si...

Why Charters Will Lose in Massachusetts – by Jay P. Greene

Massachusetts voters will be deciding in a few weeks whether to expand charter schools in the state. By all rights, the measure should be winning by a landslide.  Rigorous evaluations of existing Boston charters show large test score gains.  Charter supporters are spending millions to blanket the airwaves with ads. And following what appears to be the new ed reform ideal model,...

Charter Schools: Where They Work, Where They Don’t by Chester E. Finn, Jr.

Supporting charter schools requires tough love. It isn’t enough to create them and let kids attend them. They also need to be run with integrity; their books need to balance; their pupils must be safe; and above all, their academic achievement has to be strong, especially when gauged by student growth. Some of America’s highest-achieving schools are charters, but so are some of...

The Top 10 RHSU Columns of 2017 – by Frederick Hess

Well, 2017 is about to go in the books, and that’s okay by me. It’s been a bizarre, overheated year, and I’m more than ready to give 2018 a shot. Before we do, though, it’s worth taking one last look at the year just past—at the good, the bad, and the ugly of 2017. In that spirit, my uber-RAs Amy Cummings and Grant Addison and I sat down to comb the 2017 RHSU archives and flag ...